Detention in ELD-Land: Will Shippers Change Dock Practices?

Posted: 17 Jan, 2018 by Rip Watson


80 Comments

Categories: Trucking Regulations

Tags: BrokerCarrierOwner-OperatorShipper


DAT's Freight Talk Blog is pleased to welcome our newest contributor: Rip Watson, formerly of Transport Topics. 

 

One month into the brave new world of ELD-land, harried carriers, brokers and their customers are so focused on moving freight that a key part of the picture — detention practices — apparently isn’t changing, even though drivers’ minutes are becoming more precious every day.

Earlier this week, a Midwest refrigerated carrier executive neatly summed up the situation, telling this blogger “everyone is talking about detention [among shippers], but I don’t have a piece of paper [log] to cover their ‘sins’ anymore.”

Simultaneously, an executive from the broker side illustrated how the overall picture is changing in a potentially scary direction. He says drivers are shortening their days to make sure they don’t run out of hours and delaying deliveries to avoid running out of hours and the risk of being caught by law enforcement. He doesn’t think shippers will move truckers through their facilities faster until they see the economic consequences, which hasn’t happened yet. 

Surely, many readers will respond by saying ‘when brokers start telling shippers that they won’t get a truck, the shipper’s going to change his tune.’ Where does that leave the broker, who could find himself without a customer? How does that help anything in the long run?

Two other factors further dramatize the importance of improving detention behavior.

As crazy as the market is today, experts such as Donald Broughton, founder of Broughton Capital, remind us that it’s still January, when freight is supposed to be slow. What will happen when freight volume begins to pick up, and build toward that summer crescendo?

“We have yet to see the real test of capacity,” Broughton says. “There is broad agreement on that.” 

And, even if freight doesn’t pick up as much as expected, the April 1 date — when non-compliant drivers can be put out of service — could potentially lead more drivers to park their trucks. 

An ELD Solution for Carriers

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What can anyone do to improve the situation in ELD-land? Here are some suggestions:

Develop — and share — information - Because trucking’s time in ELD-land has been so short, we don’t really know yet how much less time drivers are spending on the road. CarrierLists hopes to have some statistical indicators ready in early February. That’s a great first step. Proof of lost time certainly would dramatize the importance of using minutes better, even if there isn’t any specific information about detention.

Trust the market to fix itself, gradually - ELD-land has been treacherous because last-minute demand from procrastinators and non-believers swamped device suppliers just before the Dec. 18 compliance date, and delayed some equipment deliveries. Some drivers are reporting technical glitches. These issues should get resolved soon, and new users will grow accustomed to the new processes.

Be patient - Shippers have an entire business to run, and transport is just one part of it. ELD-land is new to them, too, and like truckers, shippers appear to have labor shortages of their own. Given past practice, it’s unrealistic to expect that shippers and receivers will suddenly change the way they operate to always please truckers. It hasn’t happened for a century or so, when markets shifted before. Why would the ELD mandate be different?

Recognize detention as an opportunity - Driver detention has been a cause for hand-wringing and complaints whenever capacity tightened in the past. Now it's time to recognize it as an opportunity. Really. Everyone gains if the driver’s day becomes more efficient.

Sadly, one prominent brokerage official reports that some shippers are moving to tighten appointment times. At first glance, that sounds like it’s helping, but it’s not. Consider what happens when widespread traffic congestion causes a driver to miss that tighter window. The shipper’s plans are messed up, the driver is penalized, and the broker has both parties mad at them. 

In fact, tightening a delivery window also misses the important, larger point by doing nothing to address the real problem: cutting down on time spent inside the terminal.

Industry experts such as John Seidl, a former FMCSA inspector, in recent weeks have made another valuable observation. Brokers have an opportunity, and an incentive, to educate customers about the mandate.

Will information, market faith, looking at detention in a positive way, and patience eventually make life better in ELD-land? Maybe or maybe not. Tell us what you think will make it better.

Leave your comments

  • profile

    Manny

    • 1/18/2018 9:19:22 AM

    Carriers cannot tell a broker they want higher detention rates because they will be left without a load just like brokers would be left without a customer if they asked them to pay more. Some carriers say "say no to cheap freight" but some carriers will still take the cheap loads because they are left with no choice more often then they should be. It is a brokers world because they are the middle man making money off the customer and carrier. Can you believe there is brokers out there paying $150 for layovers $75 for TONU and $25/HR for detention? And in their contract they call that a "standard" makes me laugh or should it make me cry? It will take a long time for detention to change unless the capacity crunch makes the tide turn from a brokers market to a carriers market and carriers become in control of what they actually need to be paid. Right now carriers are on the bottom and the broker just pushes them around righting all sorts of crazy things in their broker carrier contracts and I mean crazy things and the carrier just has to sit there and take it.

    Reply 6 comments
  • profile

    George Vazquez

    • 1/18/2018 11:32:56 AM

    I think it's a very good ideal sure you cannot make that many pick ups and deliveries but at least the roads will be safe. I am a new truck driver and sure it is time consuming I think driving jobs are the only time when a person will stay I need time to stop!!! You can already see less drivers out at night some drivers get greedy try working all night, no sleep and that is the major 1 truck accident 2nd would be driving to fast. To all truckers let's all be safe and make it home and live another day.

    Reply 5 comments
  • profile

    Michael Nicholson

    • 1/18/2018 1:12:49 PM

    All very valid points. Flexibility on the consignee's end is probably the most important issue.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bankole Bodunrin

    • 1/18/2018 7:14:43 PM

    For us as a carrier the solution is really simple, we have moved from accepting loads based on miles, we look at everything based on hours and that determines the rate we charge. A 300 mile load to Walmart will probably take the same hours a 600 mile load will take to most places. It really simple I say no to loads that don’t make sense and am compiling delivery locations that take time to load and unload and charge appropriately. Detention, Tonu don’t make sense. Pay me upfront.

    Reply 4 comments
  • profile

    Ferrin thomas

    • 1/19/2018 4:17:49 PM

    Look, shippers and recievers have been screwing us all the years, and it wont change in the shortrun.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bradley K Boe

    • 1/20/2018 6:55:07 PM

    Docks need to allow us to drop our trailer, up to 10 hours early, then we are allowed to be off duty while they learn how to unload a trailer. Brokers need to learn how to schedule legal appointments. I will never allow a late fee.. it's other docks and improper appointments who make me late. Fmcsa should audit some shippers and recievers and learn where the pressure to break the law comes from!!! We don't want their detention pay, just a prompt unload and a safe place to park and rest?

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Matt

    • 1/25/2018 5:25:35 PM

    As I was looking for a backhaul this week, I saw a load that seemed like a good fit, until I found out it was going to AWG Associated Wholesale Grocers. They are notorious for keeping drivers 4-10 hours in their docks. I told the broker “AWG? That place is awful. No way I’m sending a truck in there.” I think that many of these disorganized detention loving receivers will be severely penalized. WalMart stores love the 3am deliveries also. It’s going to be tough for drivers to come off their 10 hour break at 4pm and make a pickup. Carriers will keep this in mind and rates will go up on these places until they figure out why. Things will really get bad after April...right now a lot of companies are still on paper.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Matt

    • 1/25/2018 5:25:36 PM

    As I was looking for a backhaul this week, I saw a load that seemed like a good fit, until I found out it was going to AWG Associated Wholesale Grocers. They are notorious for keeping drivers 4-10 hours in their docks. I told the broker “AWG? That place is awful. No way I’m sending a truck in there.” I think that many of these disorganized detention loving receivers will be severely penalized. WalMart stores love the 3am deliveries also. It’s going to be tough for drivers to come off their 10 hour break at 4pm and make a pickup. Carriers will keep this in mind and rates will go up on these places until they figure out why. Things will really get bad after April...right now a lot of companies are still on paper.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Yilie Sirut

    • 1/25/2018 8:47:37 PM

    Some days ago, I have seen many comments about that prices have increased, I personally don't think so, working for a small company 3 ,for more than 6 years and it is true that in January last year charges paid a little less than now , but in the flatbed in most of the States where prices were low are now even lower, and many of my drivers are very unhappy with while loading and unloading lost more regular while we missed tarring and straping loads for now we are very concerned because drivers are asking for increase of salarario and the owners are not able to raise wages per mile when they pay them equal or less than before

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    jammin jay

    • 1/26/2018 10:19:16 AM

    This ELD Mandate is a lot of hogwash. It has been sold to the people in the name of safety and it does nothing of the sort. You will STILL have tired drivers because there are times that a driver CAN NOT sleep, yet after a 10 hour break now they HAVE to hit the road to stay on schedule. Had there not been an ELD in their truck, they would have been able to continue down the road and rest when they had actually got tired. Giving them plenty of time to rest and still remain on schedule. The detention issue is a far more bizarre area because the brokers and shipper can TELL the carrier how much they are going to get paid for sitting there. That is equivalent to telling the restaurant owner what you are GOING to pay for your meal after you ate it. Our industry is riddled with regulations that are worthless and designed to benefit the government agencies that rule over the industry. Most of the regulations need to be rolled back and the rest of them streamlined, plain and simple.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Scott

    • 1/26/2018 10:21:22 AM

    Rate confirmations should now include the carrier's charges & amounts for same for: Detention, TONU, Layover, Com check fees, tolls, administrative charge if original BOLs required, & late payment fees. These fees should be documented and returned to brokers to execute as part of the rate confirmation agreement between the two parties.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Harleychikka

    • 1/26/2018 10:22:38 AM

    Everyone keeps harping “shippers”. It’s not just shippers, it’s very much receivers also. And they do NOT care about a trucks time because it don’t cost them. They will tell you they don’t care even. And how about lumpers? It’s against Federal Law to require a driver to unload himself or to pay a lumper. Come on OOIDA step it up and push for some results to help truckers. We all see talk, no action

    Reply 
  • profile

    Richard Percival

    • 1/26/2018 11:07:49 AM

    Shippers and receivers are going to have to adopt the fact that the truck will be there when eld hours permit and adjust there work load to the trucks arrival.

    Reply 
  • profile

    John Broadis

    • 1/26/2018 11:24:19 AM

    ELDs are a direct result of Carriers not demanding detention. Shippers and receivers have been abusing drivers for years and we took it. We took the cheap freight; we sat and waited for nothing; and we drove illegally to make sure it arrived on schedule only to sit and wait to be unloaded. The supply chain was not broken in the middle, it was broken at the ends. My latest foray in to this was 4 1/2 hours loading. The broker said they start charging after two hours but the shipper cut the bills that were time stamped before loading was complete. "So, sorry. Says here you left (after 2 1/2 hours) .

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Doug Watne

    • 1/26/2018 12:28:27 PM

    Your article should have read, "Will Receivers Change Dock Practices"? Receivers, particularly in the Grocery industry, are notorious for long unloads and tight receiving windows. Not all, but a lot. The primary issue is not with shippers. As a shipper,we are intentionally drop and hook to help facilitate driver quick turn.

    Reply 
  • profile

    AOK Transport

    • 1/26/2018 2:19:25 PM

    Again owner operators and independents the ball is in our court stop hauling cheap freight and charge detention accordingly as well as layover etc. They will either pay up or go out of business.

    Reply 
  • profile

    corny

    • 1/26/2018 3:04:31 PM

    i left off doing van freight years ago...strictly farm equipment, machinery, crane booms, construction equipment for me...

    Reply 
  • profile

    Johnny Anderson

    • 1/26/2018 3:27:16 PM

    During my last AUDIT. Fed auditor said they are working very hard on something to improve the time spent sitting at docks. Something has to be done. Ive notice shipper / receivers raised their late fees. They are racking up while they are the problem. Someone need to do something fast. Its not fair to the driver. Shipper / receivers are never in a rush. Go figure!

    Reply 
  • profile

    Ron Knight

    • 1/26/2018 6:42:24 PM

    I've seen many shippers and receivers adding penalties for late arrivals yet they have no qualms about detaining a driver past their scheduled appointment by several hours. This has to be a two way street. If you detain me for more than two hours those same penalties should apply to the shipper or receiver. Fair is fair.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Jermaine

    • 1/27/2018 6:57:23 AM

    I see brokers as 1 of the problems as well.. booking loads 20 to 30 mins before the shipper Close... I've had loads for up to 30 hrs on an 4hrs trip because a broker say hey they are going to stay late for you.. #2 detention price should triple because I've seen shippers employees avoid a load while the owner op suffer missing out on his other planed pick up .... a day lay over because of a shipper or receiver is a 1,000.00 lost for a owner op ....

    Reply 
  • profile

    Hans Witt

    • 1/27/2018 7:17:16 AM

    Shipper will not pay anything, why should they? They use intermediaries just for that reason. The little token pay out outs that broker pay , are already figured into the rate from the shipper, why should the shipper pay more ? When a shipper pays top dollar to have their product moved, why should they care about your detention time.: from their point of view your carrier lacks resources do the job, or broker hired a carrier lacking resources. Why should they pay more for bad service? They don't really care that the carrier is only receiving 60% of the true shipping payment, and that the driver is controlled by the FMSCA ball and chain.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    JR

    • 1/27/2018 7:33:21 AM

    I put all the shippers we haul for on notice that we will start charging detention after one hour of arriving to load and one hour at the consignee as long as we have made appointments or have arrived at the specified time to load or unload. So far that is working for the most part. Shippers and consignees are going to have to become more efficient in their processes for whole problem of delays etc. to be resolved. We are a flatbed company and handle a lot of oversize loads and they can be time consuming but as long as we are being compensated we will get through this!

    Reply 
  • profile

    Juan Camaney

    • 1/27/2018 10:42:16 AM

    How about lumper fees! Anybody else sick of paying for fees that dont pertain to carriers? Not my freight, why should I have to bother with paying a lumper. Brokers earn your pay, do your job and pay your own fees.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Stacy

    • 1/27/2018 12:11:22 PM

    Teams teams and more money there i just fix the problem. But you better pay those teams while they wait. Figure out a way for teams to make 200,000 a year and you’ll have all the husband-and-wife team you can handle come to work for you. SWIFT has figured it out. Sorry I know you don’t believe it but we’ve been driving for them for two years now

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Eric Brino

    • 1/27/2018 1:09:02 PM

    ELDs serves one purpose to add money to the corrupt few running the majority of the freight. 32 years and 3.5 million miles behind me. NO WRECKS to date. Safety is not a concern, control and manipulation of the industry through corrupt law makers is the key to profits for many. My rates have gone up 20 percent. Back to the times of $4 and $5 dollar a gallon fuel. They will continue to rise as the government places more illegal and unproven regulations on this industry. The economy and the people of this country will suffer as a select and corrupt few reap the rewards. When this system puts me out of work which it will. I will join the system and work the system through welfare. GOD BLESS AMERICA

    Reply 
  • profile

    Joseph Franco

    • 1/27/2018 1:51:53 PM

    This eld has made the problem worst than it was ! The brokers care about one thing and thats moving their freight as cheap and quick as possible! They want to pay no money on loads and then post cheap until the last hour and then they will call back willing to pay more "if you can pick it up in the next hour" and multistop loads are a problem ,because they want 2-3 hrs on pu and delivery .The other nite i had a 2 pick 3 drop from boca to loxahatchee then drop 1st in jacksonville for 6am .1 1/2 hr in boca then 7 hrs @ jj produce ! i got out 3 am and had to drive 5 hrs to get there at 8 am and hear that i'm late! and more waisted hrs at every stop .Did i mention trinity refused to pay detention after all that ! Brokers all starting the BS of not wanting to pay detention .They suck!

    Reply 
  • profile

    Scott buchholz

    • 1/27/2018 2:25:53 PM

    I guess the shippers and receivers don't get it it's not about wanting the detention pay it's about the shippers and receivers wasting drivers time. I sat at a shipper on Wednesday on time for scheduled appointment and sat there for over 5 hours while I was sitting in the dock they were busy unloading a dropped container that was there before me and was still sitting in the dock when I left I didn't get unloaded until I went back to the office and asked if they wanted me to bring the load back to the shipper where I picked it up. I don't want your detention pay I want to be unloaded within a hour of my appointment

    Reply 
  • profile

    Simon J Valdez Sr

    • 1/27/2018 4:03:27 PM

    The time spend at shippers is too long let's start charging them delay time after 1hr. Of waiting at a rate that it's mandatory throughout the board at $100.00 per hr. And we may see this delays been cut we as drivers have to pay a late fee when late for and appointment, but have to give shippers a 4 hrs free to load and also have to pay for lumpers at some locations at outrageous amounts and have to wait 4 to 5 hrs for them to finished let's make them accountable as well, if we have to pay them let's charge them as well ,only then shippers may get moving, mandatory 1 hr free and $100.00 delay fee after that may solve some of this problema at shippers and if not we as drivers may not feel so bad about the waiting.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Jeremy

    • 1/27/2018 6:54:29 PM

    18 years, completely safe. Owned my own outfit with 15 trucks. Sold it all last year, broke even and started selling insurance, this year staring in claims adjusting. ELD will kill the small trucking shops, it’s not worth the headache any longer, you can have it folks

    Reply 
  • profile

    tornado

    • 1/28/2018 7:46:33 AM

    There is a solution, congress and fmcsa need to mandate that the broker fully compensate the driver / carrier for alllost wages and lost loads due to detention at the dock regardless of weather they get reimbursed by the customer or not. It won't take long before the customer can't get a broker to handle their loads. Grocers are the worst, i do not haul for them period.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Jason Reynolds

    • 1/28/2018 8:49:12 AM

    I honestly believe, even though we may see some changes, the only real changes may have to be legislated. As part of the bigger transportation window. Shippers and receivers get driver to move from the property even after the extended detention time has exhausted the HOS. The have no problem ding ing drivers for being late, yet holding drivers that are on time for extended periods of time. E-logs will surely expose problems in the current legislation as well as kinks in the supply chain.. We as an industry need to find away to work within the framework. The days of drivers just making it happen are over. The guys and girls on the road take pride in what they do. Let’s create an environment where it can be done safely while compensating drivers in a manner that keeps quality drivers in the industry.

    Reply 
  • profile

    John Smith

    • 1/28/2018 3:22:23 PM

    The method shippers use to load/unload is horrible. When a driver sits for 3-6 hrs to get unloaded, that just ended your drive time. If the delivery window tightens, then the shipper will get plenty of late deliveries. A driver cann’t control traffic, ie.. an accident or highway shutdown. My question is , why cannt we go off-duty while waiting ?

    Reply 
  • profile

    Dave

    • 1/29/2018 11:33:48 AM

    It's not about pleasing the truckers... It's about moving the Frieght in a timely manner... Major shippers and receivers need to focus on a two hour window... Accepting the loaf early... Appointments are made so the operation is smooth but when everyone is showing up early or late... Their needs to be some adjustments made. Shippers need to quit holding the driver for 6 hours... Like Walmart... They are the worst, recieving and shipping... Then telling the driver to get off the property they can not stay there.. The only place is 40 miles out of town... Then you have the no parking conditions... New Mexico is horrible about parking on a off / on ramp... They are against drivers... With all this being said... Drivers need to quit stalling and stopping at every truck stop... Drive 200 miles then stop... Then drive like an idiot passing everyone and cutting people off... Just to sit at the next truck stop... I have learned to just move down the road.. Plan accordingly.. Learn how to do the 8/2 split. . Fuel up and get the truck moving again... Take advantage of the off duty driving to get you somewhere... Once your MT... And only One when your MT... Take your ten hour break... Then get going.. Quit taking 15 hour breaks.. It's so simple to figure out and adjust accordingly but if one sits around and makes derogatory remarks That time spent could of been going down the road... This is a profession that require thinking... If the shippers don't want to pay for the Frieght to move then guess what... The competor will... The shipper and receiver will be forced over time to pay top dollar... But the action has to be from everyone... Start charging the shipper/reciever 200 dollars an hour for every time they hold a truck up... The more companies that refuse to haul Walmart... Walmart will be left to either hire their own drivers or hire confident people on the dock... Walmart gets pissed if your one minute late pass the check in time... But what about the driver who shows up in hour early... They will sit for 6 hours... So being an owner op... More Walmart... Cheap Frieght... Although I will haul Costco anytime...

    Reply 
  • profile

    Todd

    • 1/31/2018 5:57:00 PM

    Before driving trucks,I worked on a Dock loading and unloading. It takes less than an hour to do both. These shippers and receivers need to be held accountable for keeping us at their locations beyond that hour. I've been in the business 23 yrs and have been in all sides,from dock worker to dispatcher and now I'm an IC. Once the shipper and receivers begin to have shipments delayed on a regular basis then things change. I help educate them to let them know how the mandate affects our HOS when delayed 30 mins over 2hrs at their facility,detention pay doesn't help unless they change the stand by time to 1hr free instead of 2 to 3 hrs before detention begins. Shorten the free time and things will change. That is going to be our policy when we launch our Broker authority to help my trucker brothers and sisters. Be cool on the stool and be safe.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Mark

    • 2/9/2018 7:51:36 AM

    Quit working with Reefer trailer and detention question will not bother you anymore.

    Reply 
  • profile

    adrian

    • 2/9/2018 7:56:33 AM

    now with the ELD drivers need to spend less time loading and unloading ,, both shippers and receivers have to help with the hours,, many times drivers need to wait up to 7hr to unload or load,, that is a abuse.. then brokers pay to us $25.00 after 3 hr,, this is a abuse..

    Reply 
  • profile

    Mujo halilovic

    • 2/9/2018 8:27:21 AM

    Sens i put eld in my truck my average day now is 7-8 hours of driving and the rest of the time I spend loading and unloading and sleeper

    Reply 
  • profile

    Buddy

    • 2/9/2018 9:24:00 AM

    NOTHINGS going to change. Last week I sat in a dock for two hours before they starting loading me. I felt the forklift on my trailer for another hour and a half. After sitting yet for another hour with no movement on my trailer and red light STILL ON, I thought Id go investigate. When I went into the warehouse and the shipper told me I had been loaded for an hour. I asked him why in the world didnt the loader turn the GREEN light on? Shipper said, " Oh, he went to lunch" NOTHING IS GOING TO CHANGE.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Stretch

    • 2/9/2018 9:44:08 AM

    What are we supposed to do when we run over our 11 or 14 at the dock. They won't let us park for the 10 hrs required rest period they force us to leave the property, or go to jail for trespassing. I only wish to comply with the regulations. But they don't care what the regulations are and that is the part that has to change. Can't we all just get along. United we stand. Divded we fall. Where is the leadership for truckers ? The fact is that put yourself first if you can't make the run legally turn the load down. Parking is an issue that must be addressed. The fmcsaregulates that we must park 10 hrs every day we should sue the fmcsa and make them address this issue. Just because there is a rest area or a,truck stop down the road DOES NOT MEAN THERE WILL BE A PLACE TO PARK. go ahead and write me a ticket for parking and you and your family will be safer when I do hit the road. Who would you rather meet on a two lane road ,, a driver that has parked illegally for 10 hrs or a driver that has been up for 14 hrs and looking for a place to park !!!

    Reply 
  • profile

    Adam Thompson

    • 2/9/2018 9:57:46 AM

    I suggest that the next course of action should be to remove all regulations. It high time the industry looks at how truly effective any of the regulations have been. I know the regulations have successfully sucked big $ from the trucking industry. I’d like to know how safe it would be if I and every other driver made the money the bottom feeders that establish these regulations take from our industry.

    Reply 
  • profile

    don Tobin

    • 2/9/2018 10:32:45 AM

    Get rid of the 14 hr rule give us back our split sleeper that would go a long way to solve the problem and start charging the shippers and receivers what they charge us

    Reply 
  • profile

    Josue Mandate

    • 2/9/2018 1:33:54 PM

    The ELD mandate should be replaced. The ELD will cause a caus between brokers , shippers and carries . The ELD mandate is unsafe , because create way too much stress on the drivers . This mandate is inhuman Thank you

    Reply 
  • profile

    Dale Jason

    • 2/9/2018 3:02:14 PM

    Here's an idea. Besides being paid detention at shippers/receivers (which is the subject of this article). What if it were "mandated" that a rule which is already in the book {FMCSA Part 371.3(a)(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(b)(c)} Look it up people! Herein lies a real problem in the industry. In fact, a few years ago Senator Olympia Snowe(R) (Maine) and Senator Sherrod Brown(D) (Ohio) introduced a bipartisan bill that would provide enforcement of this necessary transparency concerning charges paid in each and every transaction. However, of course this all important piece of legislation died on the floor of the senate as it was unimportant. (I'm assuming?). Someone please back me up on this and let's start the discussion that really needs to be . I hope I can get a response to this. If anyone truly cares, this is the place to start. Does anyone else know about this? It can't be just me. This is where we need to make a stand now. Then we can live with the ELD mandate and feel like we're getting a fair shake. Please respond, and "let's roll."

    Reply 
  • profile

    Ralph E. Baird III

    • 2/10/2018 4:49:12 PM

    Pass the law and make it mandatory with fines posting the true freight rate on the bill of lading. This will make it fair for the driver and the company owner to know what the load pays (preventing the broker from stealing the driver's revenue). And it will open up a new market for new professionals to come into the field. The companies and the owner operators will then be able to afford better equipment and keep up with costly maintenance. If the broker doesn't have anything to hide, why not PUT ALL THEIR CARDS ON THE TABLE!

    Reply 
  • profile

    Casey Kinnison

    • 2/12/2018 5:14:16 AM

    Many points have Surfaced and all legitimate gripes and or Complaints...The Trucking industry is the most regulated industry in the united states, all in the name of Safety..The powers that Be simply overlook that all the people and business that touch the industry have one goal in mind. That goal is to make a profit so they can stay in business...Shippers and receivers dont hire enough help to properly take care of their obligation of loading or unloading you in a timely fashion.. and the workers are dont care because of the measly pittance they receive.. so the corporation that runs the Warehouse can profit...The brokers have expenses they must cover..and just like insurance companies and petroleum companies they simple adjust the rate of expenditure so their profit margins remain the same..The corporations that purchase or sell the products being moved only want to pay what it takes so they can maintain their profit margin and promote lower prices..it appears that the only part of transportation industry that is NOT allowed to adjust everything around profit margin is the trucking company side of things...Though large companies have more control on their costs because of volume the small companies and independent trucks are bound by most of these useless rules set down for them to abide by while in most cases having to settle for lower prices paid to them and he abusive tactics of everyone around them...(shippers ,receivers, 4 wheeler s, abusive cost for repairs or help on the road, being charged to park in a truck stop because the few designate free spots are already gone, the abusive lumpers and fees associated with pickup and delivery, the list goes on and on) We need to have the people that created EDL wear Ankle Bracelets for a month to see how it affects their ability to do the things they have been doing for years Like going home afterwork and not being allowed to get there because home is 45 minutes away and you are breaking the law if you move. Not one thing in your life that you as a person that lives in the united states has not been transported by trucks..Yet all these stupid little 4 Wheelers feel that trucks are a burden on society and forget that the more they regulate, the more trucks and drivers will find a way around it...simply out of necessity to please the public need for the things they transport ... the SCUMBALL Ambulance Chasing Attorneys and Corporate greed has created this Crap and until trucks simply park for a month nobody gets it..You want to Regulate? Regulate the problems .NOT the solution...

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  • profile

    Hans Witt

    • 2/12/2018 10:07:36 AM

    Once again I find my self explaining trucking economics. First - there is a whole other economic dimension out there that moves truck fright, that most broker/ load boards never see. This dimension is at much higher level in the Patron/ Client pyramid. The Big freight world is not Free Market, it is Patron/ Client. Shipper is the Patron; If they use a broker ( for indemnification/ wall of separation) the broker is a client to the shipper, and has no negotiation power! The carrier , who is a client of the broker,has no negotiation power with the broker. Most shippers use both direct carriers/ clients and broker/ clients. The carrier and the broker are used as leverage against each other. That is why the loadboard statistics are not really accurate. If the carrier fails provide a truck, says" pay detention"!, the shipper gives the load to the broker, who lies to the independent carrier about load times, and who has no choice but to sit wait anyway. If the shippers direct/ client/ carrier decides he will haul load with out detention, then the load is put on their truck. The brokers and their client/ truck are not informed, so when the poor driver shows up, he is told to call his dispatcher. This is how it works in the real world, happens every day. There is aways 2 trucks for every load, whither it is real or perceived, dosen,t matter. Lot of this freight is double brokered at least 2 times. In that case you have a big logistic company who is paying both end against the middle. it boils down to 40% of the consumers shipping charges are gone before they get to the carrier. All the wizards of smart there in the truck information world act like the carrier can dictate terms at the shippers yard, may happen once, but they will never be hired again. You people don't seen to realize- the carrier/ driver is at, or on the shippers, or shippers- customer property- at their privilege! They don't have to listen to you ask for detention . If you don 't want to wait, at their privilege, you can leave! They can and will ask you leave too.They will do everything in their power maintain control. What about receivers!, every body is going on about shippers, and because they have never trucked, they seem to not realize that receivers in some modes, are much worse than shippers. If a shipper jerks you around to much, you can, and have go find a new customer/ patron, But the receiver, they they can really ruin your day, because when they hold you up, your assets are truly detained ! Your options are limited, and aways very costly- Think about that. The trucking economy is going to adjust all right, after they put the bottom 55% of the Patron/ Client pyramid out of business, witch is their plan, and robots are very patent !

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  • profile

    Reggy

    • 2/15/2018 8:00:22 AM

    So many of the shippers and receivers do not pay detention anyway, they keep you for hours and hours, and well that is just trucking. It is not right, it does hurt the driver, due to detention hours, he has to get less miles covered for the day as his clock was consumed with sitting and waiting, If a driver has to do this on both ends of a load, then he is going to loose his income level. We see more and more drivers with less and less income due to more rules put on the driver. The shipper is the one at fault, and they always have been. My experience has been that no mater what time I Schedule a truck in to load or unload, in many places they spend many hours waiting. Even if everyone went to appointments it would not help, because we have appointments already and the driver still burns up his clock waiting.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Phil Killerlain

    • 3/3/2018 5:28:19 PM

    The ELD mandate was pushed by the major carriers ATA & Trucking Alliance saying it would level the playing field ? When the field was already 95 percent leaning towards them in the dry box freight areas ! Reefers not so much except most in that area had drop & hook and had gotten away from produce except at peak times , then trying monopolize the straight picks and delivery's by lowering the rate ! But they did not think about all the repercussions ! But what's going to occur is ! And it's already in motion ! The Hours of Service will be changed so that the time lost ( still at the cost of the driver ) will not be counted against the 14 probably for an extra 2 to 3 hours per day if consecutive off ! So in the end the big box carriers will get the rates and majority of the shippers that don't delay drivers that long and the ones with enough freight will get drop & hook yards ! And just like now the smaller carriers will get the live loaders that take too long but want get the detention ! Unless enough stick to not accepting the time without pay ! But seeing as they never have since deregulation ! I see no change !

    Reply 
  • profile

    KBUTCH

    • 3/30/2018 10:18:52 AM

    I'll pay someone $25 dollars an hour just to sit in their truck, twiddling their thumbs. Any takers?

    Reply 
  • profile

    Jeremy

    • 7/9/2018 10:47:07 AM

    Worked for a company that didn't pay dt until 4 hrs was up. They called that the industry norm to sit for 3,4,5,6 or even 7 hrs on shipper or receivers. Bad company. With the e log, it shorted my day and I'd get get in trouble cause the shipper took to long and didn't get to my receiver on appt time. Either way, we parted ways. No money in long hauls as a company driver. The question I have, when should companies pay you for dt time? All the sitting I did, they never paid for. What the new laws on dt pay?

    Reply 
  • profile

    rommel

    • 7/26/2018 12:06:08 AM

    Im a trucker being charge with high detention by shipping line, but they not consider the road accident that happen to my truck. what will i do pls. help.

    Reply 
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