"Detention is Killing Us," Say Carriers

Posted: 19 Jul, 2016 by Pat Pitz


57 Comments

Categories: Trucking Industry Trends

Tags: Broker


"Detention is killing us."

That pretty much sums up how carriers feel about driver detention, as related in a recent DAT survey of 257 carriers and 50 freight brokers. Of the carriers surveyed, 84% said detention is one of the top five problems affecting their business. By contrast, only 24% of the freight brokers agreed that detention was one of their top five problems.

While brokers may feel that detention is out of their control — after all, the problem lies with the shipper or receiver — carriers clearly see the broker as the customer. And when the economy picks up, and capacity becomes tight, carriers will remember how brokers treated them during these challenging times.

Detention leads to loss of loads 

SURVEY SAYS

See the complete results of DAT's survey about driver detention.

Many carriers reported that they were compensated for only a fraction of their detention time, and their comments made it clear that those fees were not sufficient. Carriers often miss out on their next load when trucks are detained. One owner-operator reported losing two loads, with combined revenue of $1,900, because his truck was detained at a receiver’s dock.

A driver wrote: "I do not want to spend my time fighting for a few dollars of detention pay. My company loses 1-2 working days in a 10-day period due to unreliable unloading times."

Another trucker observed that detention has grown worse as capacity has loosened up. "Remember the winter of 2014?" he asked. "There was almost no detention, or detention was paid right away. Why? Because freight was much greater than carrier capacity."

Brokers and carriers view issue differently

The DAT survey also revealed a lack of communication between carriers and brokers. For example, when carriers were asked how often they were detained over the course of the year, the most common answer was 31-40%. When brokers were asked how often their carriers reported being detained, the most popular answer was 1-10%.

Brokers and carriers also had conflicting views on compensation. When carriers were asked how much they received for detention time, more than half (54%) said they were paid less than $30 per hour. When brokers were asked about the standard hourly detention rate, only 16% said they paid less than $30 per hour.

Federal government studying detention

"Driver detention is an urgent issue that must be addressed by our industry. It’s a matter of fairness," said Don Thornton, Senior VP at DAT Solutions. "Many shippers and receivers are lax about their dock operations, but it's the carriers and drivers who are forced to pay for that inefficiency."

Thornton urged brokers and 3PLs to examine their business practices, in order to address detention issues. If not, the government could step in and impose a solution on the industry.

In fact, the Department of Transportation announced last month that it is collecting data on the effects of driver detention. During Congressional hearings on Hours of Service, regulators noted that detention time causes travel delays and lost wages, and it can lead to safetys, as truckers make up for lost time by driving faster or operating past their on-duty limits.

 

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  • profile

    Chris

    • 7/21/2016 10:57:03 AM

    It is an issue for all, while the industry pits the drivers and their companies against the brokers and vice versa, the real issue lies with the shipper and receivers who demand crazy wait times to just get the business. Everyone should be focusing on them and not so quick to point the finger at each other. As a broker I see it all, lazy drivers who arrive whenever they want and mess every schedule up to the hard working driver (Most of them) who get screwed over by shippers and receivers all the time. If you speak with your broker they can help most of the time they just don't want to have the conflict with the customer and potential loss of income. Drivers think load by load, brokers think about overall volume from the customer. The shippers and receivers know who they are and everyone else does as well. They should be regulated to do a better job for everyone.

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  • profile

    Beverly

    • 7/21/2016 11:02:38 AM

    Driver's need to just drive off after A fair amount of time. If the industry would do this for about a week and let the shippers figure out they were going to be without trucks they might get more efficient. It is very unfair to trucks to delay them because yes it often jeopardizes their next load . Unless the trucking industry acts collectively they will never get the respect they deserve.

    Reply 2 comments
  • profile

    Pat boucha

    • 7/21/2016 11:05:04 AM

    Sometimes I wonder if we have( as a small fleet owner operator) people who care for us It seems there is no authorities to control or limit the way we have been abused out there by the big corporation , there is no regulations to protect us so it's a chaos

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  • profile

    Bob Farrell

    • 7/21/2016 11:05:24 AM

    "Detention" is the 2nd oldest sin! It's always been around and honestly, WILL always be around. Too many variables in transportation can impact why it occurs. The missing link I've seen too many times is "how do we collectively, minimize or eliminate it"? And there are several ways to do that, and many do not require state of the art technology; just good ol' proactive communication (which is increasingly lacking in our profession). I'd like to poise this question to the reading audience based on several scenarios that might/might not, warrant detention: SCENARIO 1 * Driver has a 10:00 appointment. He/she arrives at 10:20 (customer was notified in advance truck would be a little late). The dock door "planned" for them was utilized by a truck who had missed their 08:00 appointment and were "worked in" because of that. The driver who missed the 10:00 appointment is "worked in" at 13:00. Assuming 2 hours free time, when does this drivers detention clock/charges being? SCENARIO 2 * Driver has a load that is "FCFS". He/she arrives at 09:00, 1 hour after the gates open for business. The facility is backed up with 10 trucks in front of him/her when they arrive. The driver finally gets a dock door assignment at 14:00. Assuming 2 hours free time, when does THEIR detention clock/charges begin? Looking forward to hearing the responses from all impacted; carriers, brokers, drivers and shippers/receivers. Thanks. BF

    Reply 5 comments
  • profile

    Chris

    • 7/21/2016 11:12:37 AM

    As a broker: Here is my response: Scenario 1....no detention driver arrived late. Scenario 2: 11am 2 hours after driver arrived at the facility.

    Reply 2 comments
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 7/21/2016 11:14:59 AM

    For years, back as far an 1958 when I started in this business as a kid, the majority of the shippers and receivers always regarded the hold up of a truck past two hours, was free gratis, and the truck shouldn't complain, because they had the opportunity to haul their load. What they fail to understand, just like when they have a production line or run out of product, it cost them money, the same effect is to the trucker, when he or she loses a load, because the truck was held up, because of their lack of loading or off loading a truck. So many times, I experience been told to be at a location at a given time, and upon arriving, was held up, because they weren't ready, and refused to pay detention, because I had the honor to haul their load. This practice today, is even worse, which most shippers and receivers don't realize the cost of operating a truck. Cost of trucks & trailers have doubled, but the rates are almost the same as they were back in the 80's, Insurance, fuel, tires, highway fuel tax, permits, repairs have triple, but we are still getting rates that were being paid back in the 70s, 80's and 90's, and then on top of that, they don't want to pay detention, It not that they don't know the cost of operating a truck, many companies have looked into purchasing their own equipment, and once they found out what the operating cost was, decided against it. Its time the DOT step in and demand, that someone has to be held accountable for detention. I purchased a new truck in 1971 for $69000, today, that same truck would cost $150000. Something has to change. Like the old saying, IF YOU WANT SOMETHING DIFFERENT, THEN SOMETHING DIFFERENT HAS TO BE DONE.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bob Farrell

    • 7/21/2016 11:24:20 AM

    Hey Chris....good feedback. I actually believe (and enforce) Scenario 1 differently. Once the shipper/receiver allocated a dock door and personnel to this truck, the detention clock began "when they bumped the dock". So, free time expires at 15:00 Scenario 2 is the toughest one...always has been. I have found that shippers/receivers who still utilize a FCFS are not as efficient, thus less driver/carrier friendly as it relates to timely loading/unloading. Regardless, there should be maximums instituted for "sitting in the yard" and then apply the same detention as Scenario 1, once they are assigned a door and personnel and "bump the dock". Best case, is try to avoid locations that are FCFS (yep, I know it's tough..almost impossible) but those locations will be the first to be avoided when full ELD is implemented. Somebody, somewhere, will have to help offset carrier costs for this ineffective process. Thanks again. BF

    Reply 
  • profile

    Expert

    • 7/21/2016 11:27:49 AM

    49 USC, 14103. Shippers, receivers, trucking companies, brokers, forwarders pay for costs of loading and unloading for carriers in interstate commerce.. It's a felony to coerce a driver with " late fees" or any other type of coercion. Brokers are incompetent, they must bill their shippers for detention, and lumper fees, of be subject to a federal felony complaint under this United States Statute. The penalty for coercing any driver, is $10,000, or ten years behind bars or both, according to the National Labor Relations Act of 1932. Drivers should know their rights, and trucking are obligated to enforce those Rights.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Mitch

    • 7/21/2016 11:29:18 AM

    Chris, that would be great in a perfect world. The truth is, when you load at a FCFS facility, quite often, they never pay detention. What about the broker that tells you they can't pay detention without the in and out times being stamped on the bol's and the dock worker tells the driver they do not stamp bills with in and out times. The truck never receives a dime and the brokers know this going in. Or, the broker tells you to go ahead and bill them for detention but you won't need a new rate con they will pay it based on her or his word. Never again will I fall for this trick from a broker and no one else should either. Make them issue a new rate con or you won't receive the detention.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Catherine Mallery

    • 7/21/2016 11:42:26 AM

    It is not only carriers and drivers who are harmed by detention. As a 3PL there are many instances where we pay detention to our partner carriers and aren't reimbursed the detention by our customers because we weren't notified of the detention prior to its occurrence or a piece of paperwork the customer requires wasn't submitted by the carrier. We then have to write off this detention cost which is, also, no fault of our own. We have a standard detention policy that outlines free time, rates per hour, and necessary actions/documents to qualify for detention. Each customer has their own policy or no policy at all. We have to manage all of these expectations to try and recover detention. Additionally, as a 3PL we work with many new carriers as a business necessity but we have many long term partners. Many times the reloads our carriers are missing are ones we've given them. Detention hurts the entire industry because it kills capacity and drives up the cost of transportation. The problem is that the root cause of detention is shipping and receiving docks. We work in a service industry and everyone knows exactly how effective it is to tell your customers that they are the problem.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bob Farrell

    • 7/21/2016 11:53:35 AM

    Hi Catherine. Great points for sure. From my experience, a carrier should know the detention collection "game rules" in advance as it relates to notifying the broker/3PL when they: 1. Have arrived 2. Have been placed to the dock 3. Are approaching the end of the free time (i.e., at 60 minutes, 90 minutes, etc). If this is not done, it makes it tough to proactively involve the freight paying customer to allow them to attempt to speed up the process. Two critical pieces: - Truck/Driver notifying the above. - Broker/Carrier/3PL notifying the billable customer that the window is closing!

    Reply 
  • profile

    MYOUNG

    • 7/21/2016 12:23:27 PM

    At some point, regardless if you are a shipper, broker or carrier, a legitimate solution to the detention situation is going to have to be addressed. With the implementation of e-logs, it is going to be impossible to sit at a shipper or receiver for the length of time we are sitting now. They are going to find trucks blocking docks, or taking their down times in the shipper or receiver parking lots, unable to move. This is not even considering a lengthy detention time will prohibit a carrier from being able to charge by the mile. (Example) It will have to be done "by the hour", which will include an hourly rate at the dock priced the same as travel time. Based on a 24 hour period. Dock time is still time not making money traveling. The tighter the hours become, the more money those hours are worth. With e-logs becoming mandatory, the trucking industry is going to have to start thinking outside the box in order to stay viable. If the trucking industry is not viable, neither is this country.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bob Farrell

    • 7/21/2016 12:48:33 PM

    MYoung...you hit the proverbial nail on the head when you talk about "hourly rates versus mileage rates"! The days of when a solo truck/driver could easily get 600+ miles are virtually gone (well, we know that AND MORE, still happens through the power of trucker fairy dust...wink, wink!). A majority of the freight handled now truly is dictated by "hourly influencers": detention, congestion, road work/detours, inspections, and finding a place to park/sleep for a legal break. So why are we still proposing, billing, paying or even discussing a mileage rate? And when the ELD's are fully implemented, every MINUTE will be sucked into the DOT compliance vacuum. After decades of watching the evolution in our profession, the myriad of never ending mandates and flip-flopping of perceived or real power struggle between truck or shipper, I believe in the few years directly in front of us, there will be no place for lopsidedness and more transparency so all parties are kept whole. Will it happen? I hope so....but I still believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny! Great insight from what appears to be another industry "Silver Back"!

    Reply 
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 7/21/2016 1:05:10 PM

    I see all these comments in reference to trucks that are bumping the docks, what about the trucks, that are loading and unloading at job sites, etc. They have the same problem, as the other trucks, this needs to be across the board solution. I agree, if the truck is late and didn't give notification to the shipper or receiver, then detention is in question, based on the given facts at that time, but otherwise, a two hour free time is more than enough for a shipper or receiver to load or unload shipments, with the exception of some really big loads, which in some cases, weather, ground conditions can dictate what happens.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Joe Mowrer

    • 7/21/2016 1:56:40 PM

    When it comes to our company, detention is paid at $50 per/hr after 2 hours free loading or unloading so long as #1, the driver shows up on time or at the very least, reasonably on time (when you get there multiple hours late you may have just thrown the receivers schedule completely off and to be honest, don't appear to care about being unloaded on time to begin with, communicated delays exempted of course), #2 you communicate at say the 1 to 1.5 hour mark that they haven't touched your truck, don't seem like they're going to, etc. (this allows us, the broker to make calls to try to light a fire under somebody's butt to unload you and inform them that if not, they will be charged detention), and #3, mark your arrived and unloaded times on the BOL and have them signed off by receiver. Do these things and you will get detention $, at least by us. And when you do these things you show yourself to be a reliable carrier that a broker like myself would prefer not to piss off because I'd rather work with you again rather than someone else that may provide less quality service, primarily because communication is key.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Hiram Texidor

    • 7/21/2016 9:01:07 PM

    Dat propaganda. It's the way to keep you focusing in the wrong points

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bob

    • 7/22/2016 10:16:51 AM

    The picture of the driver that you have in this article, why is seating on the wrong side of the cab? Is this a US driver & if so when we did we start driving on the right side of the cab?

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Tug Winton

    • 7/22/2016 10:39:52 AM

    Wait , wait, wait...Detention is killing the carriers? My first question has to be since when did detention become automatic? When I drove we use to run to Frisco..get unloaded,,, then runup to Antioch to Pittsburgh steel and always sat there 8 to 12 hours before getting loaded and never got a dime. Now I get the whiny cry babies calling me and say "I been 2 hours and 20 minutes and not loaded, how much you going to pay me?" My answer is a very fast...nothing, go ahead and leave I'll get another truck in there. On drivers that are doing my OD loads, which is all I do, I have no problem paying the guys that aren't calling me after 2 hours. When they do call..say after 5 or 6 hours, I tell them please mark your time in and out beforte signing bills and I will try and get you something for your wait time sir/mam. I, and the industry should, say to the drivers and themselves, we don't have the time nor patience for the whiners any longer. Drivers today are coddled along like the world owes them something. They get paid to do a job....do your job well and be compensated well..whine, cry, and complain and you'll be headed down the street so you can become some one else's headache. My ONLY problem with Detention is that most think it should be automatic, and the others thing they are worth so much more than you, or the customer can or is willing to offer. Had a guy just recently sat at a site to get unloaded, with 12 other trucks, 7 hours. YES thats a lost day and I understand, but he was a flatbed and told me he "deserved" $125.00 per hour plus $500.00 for a layover...really?..LOL First of all when ya saw everyone else you should have known it was going to be awhile..secondly there isn't a flatbed driver a live worth $125.00 per hour!...Can I see $50 to $65 yes..layover $250 yes...but he was way oput of line and THOUGHT he had the better of me.....When he demaded it I told him to read the rate confirmation...NO detention or wait time will be paid without prior written approval by this office and/or our customer...

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  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 7/22/2016 1:31:59 PM

    I understand about the days when you use to go to Antioch and sit and wait for hours, but the DOT now has it to where, drivers can't doctor their log books like we were use to doing, so its come to a time now, if a driver is on site waiting for a load, whether he or she is getting loaded or unloaded, they have to show it on their log book, or in our case, the computer or OBR is recording it, so now the driver is legitimately is losing money one way or another, because, they no longer have the benefit of cheating on their log, because of the new laws put into place, and the cost of being on the road now days is much more expensive then when we were out there, so, compesation should be considered for the drivers and the equipment. Cost today, is much more than what it was, say just 15 years ago. We got to get real and realize, what is happening to our industry. Wake up world, the US economy, depends on trucks getting goods to the nation, and we need to get the due compensation.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Craig

    • 7/27/2016 11:44:45 AM

    While I sympathize with the drivers I think people need to remember that while things happen to drivers (DOT Inspections, break downs etc..) the same thing happens with shippers and receivers. If there could be more patience on all sides things might go smoothly. I know there is no absolute answer but in the end a little understanding could resolve a ton of issues. As for the brokers, I believe if many of these trucking companies could be better organized and quit dropping loads then they would get better help from the brokers. As a former broker nothing irritated me more than working to get a truck a load only to have them drop the load for no apparent reason. Honesty from all sides is the key.

    Reply 
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 7/27/2016 2:14:52 PM

    Its understandable that there are problems on both sides of the table, but how many brokers operating today, can actually tell you, what the bear minimum cost per mile to successfully operate a truck, I'm willing to bet, that 90 percent of them don't know, and the other probably do, only because they own or have owned trucks.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 7/28/2016 3:12:51 PM

    There is a reason for that, years ago, back into the late 40's and early 50's, truck companies had experience very difficult getting paid by customer if a claim was made, and some instance, it was so prevelant, that it put some trucking operations out of business. It came to be, that after several investigations, it became aware, that many of said claims were bogus claims. Therefore the law as it is today, was put into place, to protect the trucker. Back those years, there were a lot more independant operators and very few large trucking operations, and the independant were basically the backbone of transportation for the U.S..

    Reply 
  • profile

    Expert

    • 7/28/2016 5:21:05 PM

    The legal scheme aforementioned has been a recognized legal position, since 1881, Oliver Wendell Holmes is credited with saying it best " Gentlemen, if we are not about regulating commerce correctly, there is a real chance there would be no Constitutional commerce to regulate" So the Law comes down on the side of those who take the risk of transporting across State Lines, and against those who pay for the service. It is a felony to not pay for transportation in Interstate commerce; for without that legal scheme, there would be no interstate commerce to regulate. Think about it

    Reply 
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 7/28/2016 9:08:59 PM

    Thanks for that, that in itself, has a very strong meaning, bottom line, is, trucks keeps this country alive and thriving.

    Reply 
  • profile

    leon glass

    • 7/29/2016 6:05:56 PM

    Well about the detention pay topic.In my opinion it boils down to decency to pay a drivery if he/she is detained pass the two hour mark.Unfortunately the customers can have the same stance when we are late do to unforseen events that happen to us such as breakdown,accidents and d.o.t. I've gotten to the point as a contractor I don't even bother I would prefer my sanity. Because unless the shipper and receiver hire and train and pay people a liveable wage or even better, pay there employees by the truck.They will just ride the clock. Also tighten up the people who do the scheduling make them more efficient and accountable . I've been to places where the people in the office werw down right unprofessional.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Art

    • 8/1/2016 5:51:21 AM

    So much anger and frustration but there is an easy fix. Don't accept loads associated with abusive shippers/receivers. (grocery/foodservice in particular) OR quote high factoring in one day lost (layover+lost revenue). Detention will NEVER get fixed if there is no $ impact (and/or service) impact to shippers. When ELD becomes mandatory, detention WILL be a common discussion between shippers and carriers/brokers. When all carriers don't want to accept the load to US Foods because of 9 hours unloading, what then? They will hire for extra $$ and promise unloading in 2 hours max.

    Reply 
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 8/1/2016 10:07:03 AM

    You just HIT THE NAIL ON THE HEAD, Not Professional, on the part of most receivers and shippers, that is the biggest problem, because it involves a truck, most management in warehouses and job sites, have a very low opinion of truck or truckers, so in their mind, the trucking world doesn't deserve the professionalism that their customers are getting from them. What they forget, is once you have a shipper, a long chain is produced, from the shipper to broker, 3pl, truck dispatch, driver, receiver, and the chain is only as strong as the weakest link. Break in the chain at any one spot, and now you have no longer a strong chain or professional transaction, and ill feelings on the other parts of the chain begins, which in turn. causes distrust.

    Reply 
  • profile

    adam

    • 8/2/2016 7:29:52 AM

    I do not worry about industry standards. I worry about my standards and my desire to keep my carriers and their drivers happy. Take care of them in the good times and they will work with you in the tough times. If you can't see this (and many brokers do not), then you are in the wrong business.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Bob S

    • 8/18/2016 11:46:16 AM

    Maybe someone like DAT could design a database for average loading/unloading times at these businesses that carriers & brokers could use for reference. That way when you see that C&S in York, PA takes 11 hours to unload & 2 more for paperwork, you can plan accordingly (or avoid).

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Bob Farrell

    • 8/18/2016 11:56:28 AM

    Oh yes....I remember that place in York. We don't go there any longer. Our profession "should be" one of mutual respect for each other's time, costs, etc. Unfortunately, the pendulum doesn't always balance. But, with the pending mandates (especially ELD), there will no longer be the, err...let's call it "logging flexibility" as in the past just to make it work and allow the driver to make a small living (albeit while fatigued after this kind of delay!). Being a Customer of Choice will be something that trucks will look for. To know what that is , refer to my 2nd paragraph above. :) Thanks drivers for putting up with this kind of delay. I believe the worm is about to turn. 2018 will be the Year of the Truck.

    Reply 
  • profile

    PRP truck

    • 12/29/2016 5:01:16 PM

    Just wait it's going to be great again Trump it's coming to the rescue. So shut up and wait.

    Reply 
  • profile

    PRP truck

    • 1/2/2017 11:40:51 AM

    It's going to be great again Trump is here

    Reply 
  • profile

    Anonymous

    • 1/3/2017 9:44:04 PM

    Massive industry upset is coming. Automated trucks will see major investment capital from outside entities eager to compete. The days of needing mastery in managing fleets of drivers, dispatchers, and complex training and compliance / safety programs will be over. Replacing this will be the only thing that will matter: very large sums of investment capital and cutting edge tech savvy. The market share will begin to coalesce around a small number of very large high-tech companies, as smaller companies are driven to extinction. Smaller, midsized, and even some large traditional carriers who do not adapt quickly enough will find themselves struggling to compete with these new leaner automated carriers who do not need drivers and only a fraction of the dispatchers, who do not need expensive driver training programs, and whose compliance departments are much smaller. Every automated truck will replace almost, but not quite 2 traditional solo trucks, at a fraction of the cost. Capacity will soar. Freight rates will plummet. The remaining traditional carriers will find themselves in a backwards march, trying to determine how to downsize or change their business model fast enough to stay in the game. In this environment, detention will sting the carriers even more fiercely because shippers will be even more unwilling to pay detention. The lobbyists will follow the money, and the money will no longer be with the traditional carrier and any lobbying action will disproportionately be against the traditional carrier. In the beginning of the transition, traditional carriers may still be needed for more complex tasks such as local and last mile load powering, but they will struggle under their own weight and reduced revenue. The difficult task of many carriers will be avoiding bleeding too many resources before they are unable to make the new investments ultimately needed to overhaul their business models and adapt. In the meantime, the detention debate will grow ever more fierce and contentious, but to no avail.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Gary

    • 1/13/2017 10:19:10 AM

    I have driven TT for many years. Recently while unloading in Dallas I was sent my next load information. The problem was that I needed to drive over 100 miles to pick up, and my appointment time was about 20 min from the time I got the load info. The broker called me and told me not to worry, and the place was 24/7. After arriving almost 2 hours after my appointment time I had to wait approximately 5 hours to get loaded. After I was loaded I weighed , and was way over on axil weight. I then was made to wait 7 hours before it was adjusted. The scale I used was now closed and I couldn't check the weight again. I had to drive almost 200 miles to next scale where I found out I was still 1000 lbs over on rear. I had to manually move that weight to the front. When I asked for detention time I was informed I wasn't entitled because I was late for appointment.. I told the broker that I reported to him I would be late and why. I also asked him how being late for the appointment had anything to do with me being over loaded?? I was never paid anything for my time on this... and over the years there has been so many more. I agree that legislation is needed to insure drivers are properly compensated.

    Reply 
  • profile

    david expert

    • 1/13/2017 2:25:21 PM

    Such Laws to protect drivers from such truck Driver Coercion by brokers, shipper or receiver, and trucking companies exist, No one abides by these Laws specifically because no one wants to file a complaint with a Federal Prosecutor ss 49 USC 14103. Map 21 stretched coercion Law provision - to brokers, forwarders and trucking companies. The Law provides Penalties of upto $10,000/load for a broker, a trucking company all shippers and receivers in interstate commerce, for those people who "coerce" drivers of interstate commerce. In fact upon careful reading of (C) of this Law, means anyone including brokers who coerce drivers are ubdertaking a "felony" punishable by $10,000 and upto 10 years in prison. This Law is featured in our Loadtraining.com Hands On Classroom training, and in my downloadable book " The New Transportation Brokerage Operations Manual (C) 1987-2016. Drivers including owner operators have the Law on their side, but so few people understand the LAW. Have ypour lawyers call me I am in the book

    Reply 
  • profile

    CHUCK WILLIS

    • 1/13/2017 3:04:26 PM

    The main reason you didn't get compensated, is because the broker booked on the load 20 minutes before the appt time, but he never told his customer, that he had just booked on the load, and that you were still 2 hours away, because, he wanted to save face with the customer, and that happens a lot.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Bryce Fryling

    • 5/4/2017 12:19:12 AM

    What if residents of the affected areas simply refused to pay federal income taxes? If all of the population of the blue areas decided to withhold income taxes the federal government would come crashing down. One could argue the most populated areas if this country are not truly represented in Washington, thanks to gerrymandering and the obsolete Electoral college. Isn't that how the original American revolution started?

    Reply 
  • profile

    Elias Nestico

    • 5/6/2017 1:41:21 AM

    IF nobody gave these people (including all those in the other stupid "reality" shows) an audience, they'd all go away.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Ronald Ferrell jr

    • 7/14/2018 7:32:32 PM

    I've been out here 36 years plus and I have almost 3.8 million miles pulling tankers and food grade tankers and there's a lot of companies using the tankers for storage so when you get there the drivers sit there 2 or 3 days it's not fair for the drivers Plus you don't get paid for it that's kind of not fair so if you want to know about the industry ask me I'll tell you all about detention

    Reply 
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